Are independent or dependent views better for your project?

Are independent or dependent views better for your project?

We’ve all been there. We have to create our plans but our floorplan in our working view is too large at the desired scale for a sheet. The most common solution is to break the floorplan up into multiple views or plans. Of course, there is more than one way to accomplish this break-up. You can create independent plans, dependent plans or a combination of both. In this blog post, we’re going to briefly explain the difference between the two kinds of views and their respective pros and cons.

Independent Views

Independent Views are, as you may guess, completely independent of the parent view. When you use an independent view to create your plans, you will use scope boxes to break up the view and manage the plans with view templates. While the properties of your plan will not be dependent on the parent view, you can control which properties are shared throughout your independent views with view templates.

Pros

  • Overlapping annotation information is not an issue.
  • View templates, filters, and visibility settings can vary from plan to plan as needed or can be controlled entirely by an all-encompassing view template.
  • Infinitely flexible to meet your view needs.
  • All control lies with user: there is nothing pre-determined; you can change any or all of the properties.

Cons

  • All control lies with the user: it’s not hard to imagine that any necessary consistency may be hard to manage.
  • If you need to adjust the extents of one plan, you will have to manually move the extents of any other affected plans.

   

Dependent Views

Dependent views are views nested into a parent view. They share exactly the same properties with regards to scale, visibility settings, and other similar properties but they can have different crop regions. The original intent for these views was to be used on plans at the same level essentially showing the same information (i.e. industrial roof plans, multifamily floors (w/o partial roofs), etc.)

Pros

  • It can help the creation of views go faster in a multi-story building with many areas. Creating views can be very time consuming in some building types but dependent views are often a good solution.
  • The ability to look at the overall plan with most of the annotation on it (however most of the annotations that are really desired are very easily added to an overall working plan).
  • General organization of the views.
  • Can be made into independent views later on if need be.

Cons

  • Potential overlapping of annotation from plan to plan and constantly hiding things when crop and annotation crop aren’t enough or managed properly. The crop view doesn’t help because when we don’t want to show the overlap, it hides our dimensions for the grids.
  • Can’t apply different filters to child view or any different view settings without overriding in view.
  • Depending on which view you work in, some modification will not translate to other views so you really can’t just do all of your annotation cleanup in the parent view and assume it will all transfer to the child views. This mostly has to do with manipulation of section callout extents.
  • Rotation of dependent views must match the parent view for spot elevations to appear orthogonal.


It is a good idea to consider upfront whether or not dependent views are right for your situation.
In many cases if the different plans you are creating will be showing very similar information, such as all floor plans, or all roof plans, and the materials are consistent, using dependent views can make the most sense and create very consistent plans that are easy to work with (as long as the matchline/crop region/annotation crop is managed correctly). When you have a level that has partial roof, partial parking deck that really wants to be on its own sheet, or sets of elements that you don’t want to see from one plan to the other but they will overlap some you’ll probably want to consider using independent views.

If you’re still not sure, we recommend reaching out to your Revit or BIM coordinator for assistance. Feel free to reach out to our BIM manager, Matt Sweeney, at msweeney@pesengineers.com

For more information, check out these great references.

https://aectechtalk.wordpress.com/2016/01/22/are-revit-dependent-views-still-needed/

http://revitclinic.typepad.com/my_weblog/2010/05/override-objects-between-a-primary-and-dependent-view.html

http://www.revitzone.com/revit-fundamentals/89-dependent-views-explained